Courses

Please note: This is a full list of ERG course offer­ings; not all courses are offered each term. For cur­rent course offer­ings, please refer to the online Sched­ule of Classes.

ER 98/198 — Energy DeCal
Daniel Kam­men (Instruc­tor of Record); class con­ducted by under­grad­u­ate stu­dents
Intro­duc­tion to energy top­ics and explore the social, envi­ron­men­tal and eco­nomic con­se­quences of our carbon-based econ­omy. Includes guest speak­ers, arti­cle pre­sen­ta­tions, projects, dis­cus­sions, and films to explore the energy cycle; trac­ing its ori­gins, dis­tri­b­u­tion, con­sump­tion and waste.

ER C100 /C200 – Energy and Soci­ety
Daniel Kam­men
You will develop an under­stand­ing – and a real work­ing knowl­edge – of our energy tech­nolo­gies, poli­cies and options. This will include analy­sis of the dif­fer­ent oppor­tu­ni­ties and impacts of energy sys­tems that exist within and between groups defined by national, regional, house­hold, eth­nic, and gen­der dis­tinc­tions. Analy­sis of the range of cur­rent and future energy choices will be stressed, as well as the role of energy in deter­min­ing local envi­ron­men­tal con­di­tions and the global cli­mate. ER C100 is open to under­grad­u­ates. ER C200 is open to grad­u­ate stu­dents.  Cross-listed with Pub Pol C184/C284.

ER 101 – Ecol­ogy and Soci­ety
John Harte
Intro­duc­tion to the many ways in which our lives are inter­twined with the ecosys­tems around us. Top­ics will include eco­log­i­cal lim­its to growth, cli­mate change and other threats to bio­di­ver­sity, the value of ecosys­tem goods and ser­vices, the ecol­ogy of dis­ease, eco­tox­i­col­ogy, the evo­lu­tion of coop­er­a­tion in ecosys­tems, indus­trial ecol­ogy, and the epis­te­mol­ogy of ecol­ogy. Pre­req­ui­sites: One col­lege level course, or high school Advanced Place­ment, in either physics or biol­ogy; intro­duc­tory calculus.

ER 102 – Quan­ti­ta­tive Aspects of Global Envi­ron­men­tal Prob­lems
John Harte
Human dis­rup­tion of bio­geo­chem­i­cal and hydro­log­i­cal cycles; causes and con­se­quences of cli­mate change and acid depo­si­tion; trans­port and health impacts of pol­lu­tants; loss of species; radioac­tiv­ity in the envi­ron­ment; epidemics.

ER 175/275 – Water and Devel­op­ment
Isha Ray
Intro­duc­tion to water pol­icy in devel­op­ing coun­tries. It is a course moti­vated by the fact that over one bil­lion peo­ple in devel­op­ing coun­tries have no access to safe drink­ing water, three bil­lion do not have san­i­ta­tion facil­i­ties, and many mil­lions of small farm­ers do not have reli­able water sup­plies to ensure a healthy crop. Read­ings and dis­cus­sions will cover: the prob­lems of water access and use in devel­op­ing coun­tries; the poten­tial for tech­no­log­i­cal, social, and eco­nomic solu­tions to these prob­lems; the role of insti­tu­tions in access to water and san­i­ta­tion; and the pit­falls of the assump­tions behind some of today’s pop­u­lar “solu­tions.”  ER 175 is open to under­grad­u­ates; 275 is open to grad­u­ate students.

ER 290 — 001 – Cli­mate Change Eco­nom­ics
David Anthoff
This course is a self-contained intro­duc­tion to the eco­nom­ics of cli­mate change. Cli­mate change is caused by a large vari­ety of eco­nomic activ­i­ties and many of its impacts will have eco­nomic con­se­quences. Econ­o­mists have stud­ied cli­mate change for more than two decades and eco­nomic argu­ments are often pow­er­ful in pol­icy deci­sions. The course will famil­iar­ize stu­dents with these argu­ments and equip them with the tools to par­tic­i­pate in dis­cus­sions of cli­mate change pol­icy through an eco­nomic lens.

ER C180/280 – Eco­log­i­cal Eco­nom­ics in His­tor­i­cal Con­text
Isha Ray (Instruc­tor of Record) and Jalel Sager
Cross-listed with Envi­ron­men­tal Eco­nom­ics & Pol­icy C180.
Econ­o­mists through his­tory have explored eco­nomic and envi­ron­men­tal inter­ac­tions, phys­i­cal lim­its to growth, what con­sti­tutes the good life, and how eco­nomic jus­tice can be assured. Yet econ­o­mists con­tinue to use mea­sures and mod­els that sim­plify these issues and pro­mote bad out­comes. Eco­log­i­cal eco­nom­ics responds to this ten­sion between the desire for sim­plic­ity and the mul­ti­ple per­spec­tives needed to under­stand com­plex­ity in order to move toward sus­tain­able, ful­fill­ing, just economies.

ER 201 – Inter­dis­ci­pli­nary Analy­sis in Energy and Resources
ERG Fac­ulty
Required for and lim­ited to new ERG Master’s stu­dents. Intro­duc­tion to inter­dis­ci­pli­nary analy­sis as it is prac­ticed in the Energy and Resources Group (ERG).  Most of the course con­sists of impor­tant per­spec­tives on energy and resources issues intro­duced through a par­tic­u­larly influ­en­tial book or set of papers.  The course also pro­vides an intro­duc­tion to the cur­rent research activ­i­ties of the ERG fac­ulty and prac­ti­cal knowl­edge and skills nec­es­sary to suc­cess­fully com­plete grad­u­ate school in an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary program.

ER 254 – Elec­tric Power Sys­tems
Dun­can Call­away
Three hours of lec­ture per week.  Pre­req­ui­sites: Physics 7B or 8B or equiv­a­lent.
Pro­vides an under­stand­ing of con­cepts in the design and oper­a­tion of elec­tric power sys­tems, includ­ing gen­er­a­tion, trans­mis­sion, and con­sump­tion. Cov­ers basic electro­mechan­i­cal physics, reac­tive power, cir­cuit and load analy­sis, reli­a­bil­ity, plan­ning, dis­patch, orga­ni­za­tional design, reg­u­la­tions, envi­ron­ment, and end-use effi­ciency, and new technologies.

ER 273 – Social Sci­ence Meth­ods
Isha Ray
This course aims to intro­duce grad­u­ate stu­dents to the rich diver­sity of research meth­ods that social sci­en­tists have devel­oped for the empir­i­cal aspects of their work. Its pri­mary goal is to encour­age crit­i­cal think­ing about the research process: how we “know,” how we match research meth­ods to research ques­tions, how we design and con­duct our information/data col­lec­tion, what we assume explic­itly and implic­itly, and the eth­i­cal dilem­mas raised by fieldwork-oriented studies.

ER C283 – Infor­ma­tion and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Tech­nol­ogy for Devel­op­ment
Isha Ray and Anna Lee Sax­en­ian
A review of cur­rent lit­er­a­ture and debates regard­ing Infor­ma­tion and Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Tech­nolo­gies and Devel­op­ment (ICTD). This is an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary and practice-oriented field that draws on insights from eco­nom­ics, soci­ol­ogy, engi­neer­ing, com­puter sci­ence, man­age­ment, pub­lic health, etc. Cross-listed with School of Infor­ma­tion INFO 283.

ER 290 – Alter­na­tive Trans­porta­tion Fuels (Crosslisted with CEE 290 F)
Tim­o­thy Lip­man
Lim­ited to senior under­grad­u­ates and grad­u­ate stu­dents.
This grad­u­ate sem­i­nar will pro­vide back­ground infor­ma­tion on sci­ence, and adap­ta­tion and mit­i­ga­tion com­po­nents of cli­mate change research, explore the mag­ni­tude of increase in tem­per­a­ture due to dif­fer­ent emis­sions sce­nar­ios, iden­tify energy tech­nolo­gies and for­est sec­tor options to reduce emis­sions, describe the bar­ri­ers and chal­lenges to mar­ket­ing the above options, and dis­cuss the role of poli­cies to speed up the deploy­ment of above options in order to limit the tem­per­a­ture increase to 2°C. The class will pro­vide a forum for the devel­op­ment of orig­i­nal writ­ten mate­r­ial that chal­lenges cur­rent hypothe­ses, and, ide­ally, presents alter­na­tive theories.

ER 290 – Assess­ing Build­ing Energy Use and Indoor Envi­ron­men­tal Qual­ity (Crosslisted with Arch 249)
Ste­fano Schi­avon and Dun­can Call­away
This course will revolve around the energy and indoor envi­ron­men­tal qual­ity assess­ment of build­ings on the UC Berke­ley cam­pus, mak­ing heavy use field mea­sure­ments, data analy­sis and sur­veys. Includes a mix of lec­tures and field trips to build­ings. Top­ics include heat­ing, cool­ing, ven­ti­la­tion, energy bench­mark­ing, indi­rect energy mod­el­ing, post occu­pancy eval­u­a­tion, indoor envi­ron­men­tal qual­ity assess­ment, and basic eco­nomic mod­el­ing tools. Eval­u­a­tion based on home­work assign­ments and one final group project. Lim­ited to senior under­grad­u­ates and grad­u­ate stu­dents. Pre­req Arch 140, ER200 or equiv­a­lent, plus grad­u­ate stand­ing or con­sent instructors.

ER 290 -  005 — Cli­mate Change Adap­ta­tion and Mit­i­ga­tion: Global Analy­sis and Regional Response
Larry Dale, Jayant Sathaye and Scott McCreary
This grad­u­ate sem­i­nar will pro­vide back­ground infor­ma­tion on the sci­ence, adap­ta­tion and mit­i­ga­tion com­po­nents of cli­mate change research, explore the mag­ni­tude of increase in tem­per­a­ture under dif­fer­ent emis­sion sce­nar­ios, iden­tify energy tech­nolo­gies and for­est sec­tor options to reduce emis­sions, explore the chal­lenges to mar­ket­ing and advanc­ing these options in the local, state, fed­eral, and inter­na­tional pol­icy are­nas to address and respond to cli­mate change. Course mod­ules will address both local issues, includ­ing San Fran­cisco Bay and the State’s food and wine indus­try, and inter­na­tional chal­lenges, includ­ing India, China and the role of nego­ti­a­tion in shap­ing cli­mate change pol­icy and inter­ven­tion. Ide­ally, the class will pro­vide a forum for the devel­op­ment of orig­i­nal writ­ten mate­r­ial that chal­lenges cur­rent hypothe­ses and sug­gests alter­na­tive theories.

ER 292 A – Master’s Sem­i­nar: Tools of the Trade
John Harte (Instruc­tor of Record)
Rec­om­mended for Energy and Resources Master’s stu­dents in the fall of their first year. Lim­ited to ERG grad­u­ate stu­dents.  Quan­ti­ta­tive meth­ods for energy and resource analy­sis. Top­ics include lin­ear alge­bra, dif­fer­en­tial equa­tions, sta­tis­ti­cal meth­ods, chem­i­cal equi­lib­rium the­ory and thermodynamics.

ER 292 B – Master’s Sem­i­nar
Required for, and lim­ited to, Energy and Resources Master’s can­di­dates in the spring of their first year. Top­ics include research skills, crit­i­cal read­ing and analy­sis of research papers; devel­op­ment of Master’s project ideas. Human sub­ject research issues, ethics and pro­to­cols introduced.

ER 292C – Master’s Sem­i­nar
Required of, and lim­ited to, first-year Energy and Resources Master’s stu­dents in the fall of their sec­ond year.  Top­ics include the adop­tion of a research project, research design, pre­sen­ta­tion of work, sta­tis­ti­cal analy­ses. Stu­dents will apply the inter­dis­ci­pli­nary meth­ods, approaches and per­spec­tives learned in the core curriculum.

ER 292D – Master’s Sem­i­nar
Required of and lim­ited to second-year Energy and Resources Master’s stu­dents in the spring of their sec­ond year. Top­ics include the adop­tion of a research project, research design, pre­sen­ta­tion of work, sta­tis­ti­cal analy­ses.  Stu­dents will apply the inter­dis­ci­pli­nary meth­ods, approaches and per­spec­tives learned in the core cur­ricu­lum. Sequence begins spring each year.

ER 295 – ERG Col­lo­quium: Spe­cial Top­ics in Energy and Resources
Dun­can Call­away with guest speak­ers
Pre­sen­ta­tions of research in energy issues by fac­ulty, stu­dents, and vis­it­ing lec­tur­ers. Master’s degree stu­dents required to enroll for two semesters.

ER 296 – Doc­toral Sem­i­nar
Isha Ray with guest speak­ers
Pre­sen­ta­tions of cur­rent Ph.D. research. Lim­ited to ERG grad­u­ate students.

ER 299 — Inde­pen­dent Research
For infor­ma­tion on inde­pen­dent research units with indi­vid­ual fac­ulty mem­bers please con­tact the depart­ment at erggrad@​berkeley.​edu.